Free Saxophone Lessons & Information
On classes and sounding better

Ask a Question Here

Saxophone Fingering Chart – Learn How to Play All the Notes on Saxophone! Diagrams

by Neal

(This fingering chart is for alto/tenor/soprano/bari, all saxophones)

It’s also a web based chart, not meant to be printed. Check out http://SaxophoneTribe.com which includes a printer friendly version.

If you are just starting to play, here is a video where you can also see my fingers for the mid range of the saxophone.

Why the format of this fingering chart?

Saxophone technique alone does not make a great musician…..

But it does enable a sax player to be great.

Not needing to think about technique allows the you to connect to music and share what is inside of you.

Most saxophone fingering charts are on one sheet of paper.  This one would take a lot more paper than that if it was printed out, so don’t do that.

Having the diagrams separately but larger allows you to see everything clearly and for more notes to be included right next to the keys themselves.

The diagrams for the different notes are set up like you’re holding and playing the saxophone in front of you.

The keys on your right will be on the right side of the diagram.

This seemed more intuitive to me.

Most of the chart you can get to from this page, you can sign up on the side with your email to get a password for the fingering chart on this page.  Head over to Saxophone Tribe to learn more about playing the saxophone – with more lessons, connections, and places to ask questions.

Dark keys mean they are pressed down.

Low:

| Bb/A#B/Cb |   C/B#C#/DbD |

| D#/EbE/FbF/E# |

Middle:

F#/GbG | G#/Ab | A | Bb/A#B/Cb |

|   C/B#C#/DbD | D#/EbE/Fb |

High (top of staff and up):

F/E#F#/Gb | G | G#/Ab | A | Bb/A# |

B/CbC/B#C#/DbD | D#/EbE/FbF/E#F#/Gb |

You can download a high resolution saxophone fingering chart that I put together (with Bret’s program) when you join a saxophone class at Sax Station.  Otherwise, enter your email to the right and get a password to access it online.

Saxophone Finger Chart A#

A# or Bb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Bb
Saxophone Finger Chart B

B or Cb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Cb
Saxophone Finger Chart C

C or B#
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart B#
Saxophone Finger Chart C#

C# or Db
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Db

D

Saxophone Finger Chart D

Saxophone Finger Chart D#

D# or Eb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Eb
Saxophone Finger Chart E

E or Fb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Fb
Saxophone Finger Chart F

F or E#
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart E#
Saxophone Finger Chart F#

F# or Gb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Gb

G

Saxophone Finger Chart G

Saxophone Finger Chart G#

G# or Ab
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Ab

A

Saxophone Finger Chart A

Saxophone Finger Chart A#

A# or Bb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Bb
Saxophone Finger Chart B

B or Cb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Cb
Saxophone Finger Chart C

C or B#
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart B#
Saxophone Finger Chart C#

C# or Db
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Db

D

Saxophone Finger Chart D

Saxophone Finger Chart D#

D# or Eb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Eb
Saxophone Finger Chart E

E or Fb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Fb
Saxophone Finger Chart F

F or E#
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart E#
Saxophone Finger Chart F#

F# or Gb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Gb

G

Saxophone Finger Chart G

Saxophone Finger Chart G#

G# or Ab
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Ab

A

Saxophone Finger Chart A

Saxophone Finger Chart A#

A# or Bb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Bb
Saxophone Finger Chart B

B or Cb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Cb
Saxophone Finger Chart C

C or B#
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart B#
Saxophone Finger Chart C#

C# or Db
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Db

D

Saxophone Finger Chart D

Saxophone Finger Chart D#

D# or Eb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Eb
Saxophone Finger Chart E

E or Fb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Fb
Saxophone Finger Chart F

F or E#
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart E#
Saxophone Finger Chart F#

F# or Gb
(Same Fingering As)

Saxophone Finger Chart Gb
Ask a Question Here
Class Samples

{ 95 comments… read them below or add one }

Dolu January 16, 2011 at 2:45 pm

Hey Neal,

Your fingering chart looks great. Do you have any altissimo fingering charts. I discovered some altissimo fingerings on my own up to c4 that I would be willing to share. By the way, What’s the highest note possible on the tenor?

Reply

Neal January 16, 2011 at 2:55 pm

Hey Dolu.,
Thanks. I have various altissimo fingerings from different places in books and things. But I would like to compile a more complete version and post it. That would be great if you had some stuff to share.

Highest note on tenor in the altissimo range? That depends on your level of control…….

-Neal

Reply

Olivia February 19, 2011 at 10:37 pm

Hey Neal,

I play the alto sax and I was wondering if you knew the fingering for a low A for the alto? I can’t find the fingering for it and I’m working on 2 octative scales and i need the fingering for the C Concert scale

Thanks

Reply

Neal February 20, 2011 at 4:59 pm

Hey Olivia,
Low A isn’t an option for almost every alto and tenor sax (a few exceptions are very uncommon).

There is sometimes a low A key on baritone saxophones (and bass, etc – the lower saxophones).

But generally Bb is the lowest note on saxophone.

You can still play scales across the range of the saxophone, and I would encourage you to do so. Being able to play the range of the saxophone will give you flexibility. You just will need to go down to the notes that you can actually play. And for alto sax, the lowest note is Bb (almost always).

-Neal

Reply

Sebastian May 11, 2011 at 7:00 pm

Although it isn’t technically a ‘proper’ fingering, if you play the low Bb and then cover the bell of the horn with your knee/leg, the pitch does drop to a low A. Just a nifty trick I picked up ;)

Reply

Neal May 11, 2011 at 8:40 pm

Hey Sebastian,
Yep, that will get you down there. I’ve done it once or twice for kicks and seen it done. But not especially practical in most cases.

Reply

Ali Amiri May 14, 2011 at 8:31 pm

The Saxophone Finger Charts at this web site is the best that I have come across. I can’t wait to get started. Thanks a million, Neal!

Reply

Neal May 15, 2011 at 1:39 pm

Thanks Ali, glad they’re helping you.

Reply

antonius November 2, 2011 at 5:04 am

neat thank you

Reply

Neal November 25, 2011 at 4:53 pm

You’re welcome

Reply

Andy Anderson November 25, 2011 at 4:37 pm

I am almost 82, and I haven’t played for almost 50 years. One of my sons gave me a alto, and said “Dad didn’t you once played a sax? here is one for you to try again.” I am still active and play golf once a week. Any advice?

Reply

Neal November 25, 2011 at 4:54 pm

Hey Andy,
Just try and play it a little each day. Not sure how long you played it for before the fifty years. What would you like to be able to play on your alto?

Reply

Andy Anderson November 25, 2011 at 6:19 pm

Thanks, I played some between ’47-’60. School band and a small group. Have to learn to read the notes all over again. Now it will be mostly church music. Any help?? Thanks

Reply

Neal November 25, 2011 at 6:25 pm

Cool, I think reading music will come back fairly quickly. You want to start with simpler things then progress. Is the music written in Eb at your church or will you have to transpose?

Reply

Andy Anderson November 25, 2011 at 6:38 pm

At the present we don’t have any sheet music for a sax, so I guess I will have to transpose, if I can remember how. Thanks

Reply

Neal November 26, 2011 at 4:25 pm

Hey Andy, basically an Eb instrument like alto sax is a minor third away from ‘concert pitch’ – piano/guitar/flute, etc. So an Eb on piano is a C on alto sax. Each note written in C is that distance away for an Eb instrument.

Reply

Johnathon November 25, 2011 at 10:09 pm

Hey, im fifteen and a sophmore in highschool. I haven’t been in band since 8th grade and now I’ve decided to join again. Any advice for me? Thanks.

Reply

Neal November 26, 2011 at 4:24 pm

Hey Jonathan,
You probably want to do some long tones to get your sound strong again. Know your major scales. What kinds of music are you playing?

Reply

Johnathon November 26, 2011 at 10:37 pm

I’ll be playing in a marching band so im assuming a variety of pep music mostly.

Reply

Andy Anderson November 27, 2011 at 12:23 am

Thanks for the info I will see if I can work on using it.

Reply

Neal December 1, 2011 at 6:23 pm

You’re welcome.

Reply

Katie December 18, 2011 at 9:42 pm

Hey, I just started learning the sax. I have pretty much all the notes learned but G#/Ab is giving me trouble! According to the finger chart, you play a G but then add the left hand pinky. When I do this, it doesn’t change the G at all. Does it need repair?

Reply

Neal December 18, 2011 at 10:31 pm

Hey Katie,
There are four keys that your left pinky can press down, make sure you’re pressing the top most one. When you press it does anything move? If nothing moves when you press it, you probably have a ‘sticky pad’.

That’s actually a key that can tend to stick. Because of the design of the saxophone, condensation and whatever goes into the saxophone gathers there. Regardless of the reasons, it happens.

Sometimes it is just delayed because it’s sticky. But check to see what happens when you press the key. A button should rise up on the saxophone.

To keep it from getting sticky, just drink water while playing sax and don’t eat anything or drink anything with sugar right beforehand. Ideally you want to brush your teeth before you play.

-Neal

Reply

Katie December 18, 2011 at 11:59 pm

Thanks for the quick response! Yes, a button near the one I am pushing down rises. There is also a large button on the “tail” that goes down but a lot of times it does not go down all the way. Is there anything I can do by myself to fix this or will I have to take it into a repair shop?

Reply

Neal December 19, 2011 at 12:03 am

You’re welcome, figure it’s something that comes up a bit. Was going to write a little more about it in a post.

You’re saying when you press the G# key that it causes two keys to be affected? You might be pressing one of the other left pinky keys. The one for G# is the one at the top of the ‘table’.

However, if another key is not going all the way down….. you might be able to fix it yourself, but you could also break something. So I wouldn’t necessarily recommend trying to fix it unless you know what you’re doing. What kind of saxophone do you have? And are you able to play all the low notes without a problem?

Reply

Katie December 19, 2011 at 12:11 am

Yes. I believe I am pressing the right one. It’s the button closest to where the third finger on the right hand goes, on the table. So only one key should move and it rises? I have E.M.Winston alto sax. G# is the only note giving me problems. I will try bringing it into a shop.

Reply

Neal December 19, 2011 at 12:16 am

The one at the top of the table. http://saxstation.com/saxophone-fingering-chart-ab-or-g-on-the-staff.htm

It should make just one pad lift.

Yes, you might want to take it to a shop. Basically they would need to bend it so that it closes all the way. The pads don’t need to open up too far to function, but they do need to close all the way. I imagine it wouldn’t be a repair that was too expensive.

Reply

Katie December 19, 2011 at 12:18 am

Ok. Thanks for your help, Neal!

Chris January 4, 2012 at 11:40 pm

Neal,
Its been 12 – 15 years since I have touched a saxophone, I played the Baritone in High school and a little alto for church and band and I am pretty musically inclined. I was never able to read notes or even tell you the name of a note pointed out, but I was able to see tham and know where my fingers belonged. I have been doing a basic scale all day, but I was wondering if You could lead me in the right direction to get me better than where I left off.
Im looking to go more blues, or do R&B covers or just covers in general. Music that would be flexible enough for me to improve to.
thanks,
Chris

Reply

Tosin January 9, 2012 at 4:14 pm

Hi Neal, I’m just coming up on sax. I’ve been able to play all the chromatic scales on all the 12 keys although not perfectly.
I can’t read music sheet but i desire to know how to read them.
What can I do to improve my improvisations while playing?
How can you be of help to me?

Reply

Mick57 January 21, 2012 at 9:04 am

Great help Neal thanks

Reply

edward January 25, 2012 at 5:49 pm

i am trying to find a fingering chart that shows the high A,and G.(alternate fingering) also what is the key above the B and what is the key next to the high F# thanks for the help.

Reply

Cort February 6, 2012 at 6:55 pm

Hi I don’t understand how to get the printable version.

Reply

Neal February 7, 2012 at 4:32 pm

I had made a downloadable version that you could buy, but it was around 50-60 pages long since the diagrams are large. Will work on making a printable version, might sell it for $1 or something.

Reply

glen holiday February 18, 2012 at 7:16 am

Neal, you have put a great site together. Thanks.

Reply

Neal May 5, 2012 at 4:53 pm

Thanks Glen!

Reply

Holly May 3, 2012 at 6:37 pm

Hi Neal, great site! I just started playing my tenor again after 15 yrs and I’m having a problem with the F key. I can’t get the right sound out of it. From what I can tell when I have the key pressed down, it’s not leaking any air, but it sounds like it is. Pad replacement perhaps? Any suggestions would be great. Thanks!

Reply

Neal May 5, 2012 at 4:54 pm

Hello Holly, if you take it to a repair person they can use something called a ‘leak light’ which might help you figure out the issue. Is another pad maybe sticking?

Reply

Vicky May 5, 2012 at 6:35 am

Where is the best place to hold when you are trying to play C sharp on alto sax like the begining of Careless whisper sexy sax man. I struggle holding the sax in a place where I won’t affect the note.

Reply

Neal May 5, 2012 at 4:55 pm

Hey Vicky,
In general, you want to keep all of your fingers on the keys. Not pressing them down, but in contact.

If that’s difficult to do without pressing keys, you might need to adjust your neckstrap.

Reply

bruce May 30, 2012 at 11:18 am

hey Neal, bruce here. a couple of months ago you had a video up, basically it was your philosophy on the saxophone. and in the background you had a medley of professional sax players,”. each piece was about 15 seconds long and at the end it had the names of the musicians. I only saw it once and I can’t seem to find the video anymore. it’s still up can you point me in the right direction. thank you so very much for your time. B

Reply

Neal May 31, 2012 at 12:06 am

Made that video a while back. It’s one of the earliest on that channel

http://youtu.be/aVJ9_oQa4-A

Reply

vava June 22, 2012 at 3:45 am

Neal, you’re awesome, thanks man, it’s really help me :D

Reply

Neal June 24, 2012 at 7:26 pm

Thanks Vava

Reply

Peter Sabino July 1, 2012 at 6:20 pm

Hey Neal, I just got my Alto Saxophone today And have no where to start. What are the first things I should learn? I already can make different notes, but i’m now stuck. Feel free to email me or simply just leave a comment. Thank’s.

Reply

Neal July 1, 2012 at 11:18 pm

Hey Peter,
You can check this out http://saxstation.com/saxophone-foundations if you want a guide to getting started and some help from me. Otherwise, you probably still want a book and teacher.

Reply

emmanuel August 29, 2012 at 3:56 am

i bought the auto sax for over 6mnt now no body to put me through on the key and i dont wona loss interest on it,dont know if i can get any manual from you,am not working i would have ask for something better this i want to use to earn my living pls help me

Reply

Neal September 7, 2012 at 2:01 pm

If you want to play sax for a living, you probably should pay for some lessons if you’re serious about it. Check out http://saxophonetribe.com if you’re interested in studying with me, it will probably cost a bit less than private lessons.

Reply

Allen October 2, 2012 at 5:46 am

Hi Neal,
I started playing a Conn tenor which is in a good condition and i was able to play some notes .My problem is that i can’t play the octave notes , whenever i play them it plays growling kind of sound.
I was able to play the pink panther ,from the video you posted and in that piece there was no octave notes so it was easy .
So can you please tell me how to blow these octave notes.

Thank you
Allen

Reply

Neal October 2, 2012 at 7:11 pm

Hey Allen,
Yep, that piece doesn’t use the octave key. That’s a little strange. How long have you been playing for?

You don’t need to actually press the octave key to get the octave, but it helps. If you ‘overblow’ it should raise it by an octave. With that in mind, try it out.

And you’re sure nothing is wrong with the octave key?

Reply

Emily October 4, 2012 at 9:56 pm

Hi I’m having problems with my high G and D I’ve just had it repaired and theres no difference I have also being playing for a year is there a certain way I need to have my mouth to make it sound right
Thanks

Reply

Neal October 8, 2012 at 2:35 pm

Hey Emily, can other sax players get those notes without a problem? (on your horn, using their own mouthpiece)

In terms of embouchure, there are a few ways that will work, I’m not exactly sure how you’re playing now, so I can’t really give you any suggestions.

Reply

Ermel October 23, 2012 at 4:56 pm

Neal, do you have the high F# fingering for the Buescher Aristocrat 140 Alto (1951)??
send me a diagram or photo.

Reply

Neal October 23, 2012 at 5:03 pm

Hey Mel, does that model have a front F key? I’m assuming it doesn’t have an F# key. Thanks

Reply

Alade Ebenezer Oluwaseun October 30, 2012 at 10:54 pm

Hello mr Neal, Please I want you to tell me the meaning of #,b on saxophone

Reply

Neal October 30, 2012 at 11:22 pm

Hey Alade, not a bad question. So in Western music, there are twelve tones. Consecutive pitches progress by 1/2 steps, the smallest unit of pitch (in Western music). Adding a b lowers a note by a 1/2 step, adding a # raises a note by a 1/2 step.

The same pitch can be written in different ways. So an Eb is a 1/2 step below E, a D# is a half step above D. A D# is a 1/2 step below E and an Eb is also a 1/2 step below E. So a D# and Eb will be the same pitch.

Reply

Chris November 20, 2012 at 3:53 pm

Neal,

When/will you have a class for extreme beginners?

thanks
Chris

Reply

Neal November 20, 2012 at 4:03 pm

Hey Chris,
I made exactly that, http://saxstation.com/saxophone-foundations

Thanks

-Neal

Reply

sergio oliver January 17, 2013 at 9:07 pm

good

Reply

kimboss March 23, 2013 at 6:01 am

Great thanks…..
Neal….

Reply

sutha March 30, 2013 at 3:37 am

hi neal
could you send me notes for stevie wonder i just called to say i love you in capital

Reply

Neal March 30, 2013 at 3:11 pm

Don’t know that song yet. Will think about doing a lesson on it.

Reply

sutha March 30, 2013 at 3:38 am

i am new beginner i can not read notes!!!

only in capital.

like G# F#……..

Reply

Neal March 30, 2013 at 3:10 pm

You probably want to learn how to read music.

Reply

olumide April 12, 2013 at 8:14 am

hi neal you are doing a great job and you are also a great encourager and inspirer.

Reply

Neal April 12, 2013 at 12:53 pm

Thanks olumide

Reply

jas.huggins May 13, 2013 at 6:17 pm

hey neal, correct my self.i bought my walstein Bauhaus bronze tenor sax.from russ becker.com.who sale these horns in u.s.a. a real,real nice guy.i had his name wrong.so I had to correct my self.jas.huggins

Reply

Helene Alexander June 8, 2013 at 7:07 pm

do you have these charts for tenor sax, this is confusing me

thanks, I really know Zero about playing, but think i should know where the notes are and where they correspond on sheet music?

Reply

Neal June 8, 2013 at 7:50 pm

Yes, these fingerings work on tenor also. Don’t ask the same question twice, thanks.

Reply

Brian H. Littleton June 15, 2013 at 10:58 am

Hi Neal, I tried to prnt these fingering charts with their corresponding notes Low and high,guess the printer doesn’t work as well as I’d like it to

Reply

Neal June 15, 2013 at 1:43 pm

The chart on this page wasn’t designed to be printed, it’s designed to be viewed on the web. Not a good idea to try to print it. I made another version that’s meant to be printed.

Reply

John Pelucci August 19, 2013 at 7:19 am

Hi Neil

Thank you for all your feedback. I have been away for a while and only just back. I was having trouble with my Alto Sax the last time I played, keys sticking. I have checked on the net for cleaning but nothing is mentioned about the pads been cleaned or lubrication. Would you suggest a link or what should be used. I am starting again tonight after work, 17.00, +- 1 hour a night ( Mon To Friday ).

Thank you once again. Have a nice day.

John

Reply

Neal August 19, 2013 at 11:59 am

Which keys are getting stuck?

Reply

Brooks August 25, 2013 at 9:13 am

A saxophone tech (British) on a web page sax forum recommends lighter fluid on a cotton swab to clean sticky pads. He says it caused no harm to the leather pads and causes no harm to the finish. I tried it on a G# and it worked.

Reply

John wilson September 24, 2013 at 7:50 pm

Neal can you tell me all the notes and fingerings for happy birthday on Tenor Sax. (By the way Your a really cool Sax player) thanks for the help

Reply

Neal September 24, 2013 at 10:18 pm
John wilson September 24, 2013 at 7:53 pm

I’m only in the 6th grade so i’m new ,any advice you have will help.

Reply

Jennifer October 12, 2013 at 8:33 am

I’m in fifth grade and I only know the notes A, B, C, D, C#, and G. What songs can I play with those notes other than hot cross buns, witch I know already. Please leave me a comment!

Reply

Neal October 12, 2013 at 1:36 pm

Hello Jennifer,
You can play very few songs with that many notes.

Once you learn at least a complete major scale, you’ll be able to play many more songs. Probably get F major, G major or C major first.

Reply

Emylee November 19, 2013 at 3:34 pm

This is so much help thank

Reply

Derek January 10, 2014 at 4:39 am

Hey Just found your website and was reading some of the questions.
I got one!
In 1996 I lost my index and middle finger on my left hand/ I was a decent guitar player switched to left handed bass and some guitar and now playing the heck out of the drums. But guess what I been thinking hard about trying the sax.Never picked one up but I absolutely love a sax sound . Im into blues and some smooth Jazz lot of improve type music/What do you think could I adapt to a sax with my missing fingers

Reply

Neal January 11, 2014 at 4:10 pm

Hello Derek,
That would make things challenging.

There was a ‘right handed’ saxophone made at least once before. Maybe that could be something to look into, not common though.

Reply

Shawn February 11, 2014 at 6:13 pm

Derek, you should consider trumpet if you enjoy smooth jazz/improv. The valves are controlled with the right hand and the 3rd valve slide and 1st valve slide are controlled with the left ring finger and left thumb respectively. I completely understand why you love the sound of the sax though.

Reply

Nacauta January 13, 2014 at 2:52 pm

I really need to know how to play the saxophone,but my music teacher just dont know the notes.And the internet isn’t giving me a clear picture of the fingering charts.Help me, plzzzzz!!!!

Reply

Neal January 13, 2014 at 3:55 pm

I added another video to this page, watch that.

Reply

manny May 18, 2014 at 2:33 pm

um hi Neal I just started your program today but I wanted to know if you have stuff to learn about about jazz because I love the sound of the sax and plus it was a gift for my 11th birthday a week ago

Reply

Neal May 19, 2014 at 12:36 am

Hey Manny,
Yes, I play some jazz. If you have a question, go to this page, http://saxstation.com/ask-a-saxophone-question

Thanks

Reply

victor May 25, 2014 at 9:33 am

hey neal… Good job you’re doing here… I’m not too used to playing the sax though i’m too good in the recorder buh there are a number of differences in the fingering pattern of the duo. I picked up a sax the other day and i could play few songs very well, i need a clearer, probably pictorial fingering charts to depict all the keys from “A’ to ‘G#’ thanks bro

Reply

Neal May 28, 2014 at 10:28 pm

Click on the notes and you will see diagrams.

Reply

Wendy July 14, 2014 at 1:36 am

Hi Neal, had a few lessons on Sax but then my work changed and I did not have enough money to continue. My father( who is 86) has just bought me my very first Alto Sax! Feel so chuffed, even in my fifties! Found your site, thanks for info, appreciated! ;)

Reply

Neal July 14, 2014 at 3:32 pm

You’re welcome Wendy

Reply

Rachael July 28, 2014 at 11:51 am

Hi Neal,

I am trying to access the notes on the fingering chart as I am trying to play “All of me” – John Legend.
I have the music for the Alto Sax, but am still unsure where my fingering should be on the sax as I have not had chance to practice since I got my sax and have only really tried to play some of the songs you have on youtube.

I used to read music well when I was very young, but haven’t used it for a LONG time so I am refreshing myself along with learning my fingering.

I am a subscriber and the last password I was sent was on the 17th July and this does not seem to be working. Please help! I am dying to learn how to play this tune as it sounds perfect on the sax.

Thank you so much by the way for your awesome site, youtube videos and everything that you do to make a ‘wannabe’ like myself confident enough to be an ‘almost’!

Rae :)

Reply

Neal July 28, 2014 at 1:54 pm

Just emailed you. Good luck with the song.

Reply

burak burtul September 10, 2014 at 4:42 am

Grear Lesson !
Thank you very much.
I appraciated your teaching style.

Greetings from Turkey .

Reply

Neal September 13, 2014 at 5:26 am

Thanks Burak

Reply

Leave a Comment