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Fork E on Saxophone? Alternate fingering for high E on Sax

by Neal

Wayne asked me about what fork E is today.

I just started useing my high f# key. working on control. I’m a very advanced guitar player and i only play by ear but i learn very fast if i can watch others on video. you taught me how to play careless whisper. i also am playing baker street.

I heard about fork e or fork f fingering . do you know what i am talking about? can you tell me how thats done?

Thanks
Wayne
So he had heard of the fork E, but wasn’t quite sure what it was.
It’s an alternate fingering for high E that does not use the palm keys.  There is a similar alternate fingering for high F that doesn’t use the palm keys either.  The alternate for high E is probably less known though.  It can be useful though, I found it to be a good option when playing Stanley Turrentine’s solo on ‘The Hustler’.
The ‘fork E’ is on the right side, it uses the front F key, octave key, and left hand second finger and third finger.  Not the key that normally goes down for B.
Saxophone Fingering Chart E Above the Staff

Saxophone Fingering Chart E Above the Staff

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{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Tochukwu Anopueme February 1, 2012 at 3:41 pm

i want to improve on my sax skills. Just stated 7 months ago and have improved in my major keys. Trying to know the minors and other alternative fingerings and all others i need to know.

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Neal February 3, 2012 at 5:46 pm

Hey Tochukwu, cool, just take them one at a time. Do you understand how modes work?

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Tochukwu Anopueme February 6, 2012 at 9:39 am

I’m yet to understand what modes mean. Can you please explain further.

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Neal February 6, 2012 at 1:41 pm

Hey Tochukwu,
So a C major scale has seven notes in it. If you start on C, it’s the C major scale which is also known as the ‘ionion’ mode. If you start on D and play all of the same notes, just start and end on D, it’s a mode called ‘dorian’. If you start on E it’s a mode called ‘Phyrgian’. Starting on any note, there is a name for the mode. You still only play the notes from the C Major scale though. The modes have distinct sounds.

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Tochukwu Anopueme February 7, 2012 at 2:09 pm

i can now understand what modes are but how do we apply them accurately in a song or where is it necessary to apply them

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Neal February 7, 2012 at 4:33 pm

If you see a dominant seventh chord, written as G7, that means you can play a mixolydian scale, so the G7 would have the same notes as C major. If you see a minor chord, you can play a minor mode that starts on the chord name, etc.

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Andy H December 31, 2012 at 2:43 pm

Are there fork fingerings for all the notes that are normally played with the palm keys, or just some of them?

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Neal December 31, 2012 at 3:03 pm

Hey Andy,
There’s one for F#, could be one for F, but it’s not one that I have used.

Then below E, like Eb and D, I would just use the palm keys, not sure if there are fork keys for those either.

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onos April 12, 2014 at 10:30 pm

pls i would like to get all the sharp keys note diagram of the alto sax

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Neal April 13, 2014 at 8:35 pm

Enter your name and email address in the yellow box to get access to that.

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